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Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-11-2016
0

Non-Hazardous in Vertical Hood

Our facility is located in California. The way our hazardous sterile compounding area is laid out is: ISO7 ante room (with sink) that leads to our ISO7 negative pressure room. Within the ISO7 negative pressure room, we have two ISO5 BSC (vertical) hoods.

 

We're currently having a dilemma about how to compound our non-hazardous meds (i.e. ondansetron, granisetron).

 

Does anyone know if it is possible to make non-hazardous meds in a BSC (vertical) hood? We were thinking of segregating all the non-hazardous meds and making it in one of the ISO7 BSC hood, then segregating the hazardous/chemo meds in the other ISO7 BSC hood. We can't remember if it's written somewhere in law or USP797/USP800 that frowns on this type of practice or not. We're definitely not going to comingle the meds in one hood. They will be segregated out.

Advisor
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎07-13-2016
0

Re: Non-Hazardous in Vertical Hood

According to the "Chapter 800 Answer Book" page 77, 12.3-11

 

"<800> allows this for occasional use, but it is not ideal"

 

The issue is that if you compound a non-hazardous dose in a hood used for hazardous compounding (and I think that would extend to compounding it in a room used for hazardous compounding) you then must treat that compounded dose as hazardous (becuase we assume that the hood/room is contaminated and so the dose you prepared there might be contaminated)  - which means you must transport, administer and dispose of it as you would a hazardous drug.

 

The type of hood is not the issue, so I imagine you might be ok to use a BSC that has never been used for HD compounding, or has been decontaminated as you would before hood disposal, however there is still the issue of contamination in the room.

 

 

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Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-11-2016
0

Re: Non-Hazardous in Vertical Hood

Thank you for the reference.

 

It looks like that Chapter <800> answer book is pretty helpful. Because I also saw another question I had about if it was possible to compound an hazardous and non-antineoplastic med in a LAFW.