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Occasional Visitor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-26-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

My original license says nothing about being registered,  it says I am licensed and it is that way in Washington state and Arizona.

 

I've only worked once with a Pharm D and we did the same work.  She even encouraged me not to upgrade from my BS to a Pharm D.  She felt it unnecessary for our independent retail pharmacist job.

VIP
VIP
Posts: 92
Registered: ‎03-01-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

 Interesting discussion. Unfortunately I've seen it many times before. It's almost as common as the "my pharmacy school is better than your pharmacy school discussion." 

 

Let me give my take on it. Whether you have a PharmD or a BSPharm makes virtually no difference once you're in the work environment. I can say without hesitation that I've found pharmacists with both degrees that are great and some that are awful. The "RPH" designation (or whatever credentialing your state uses) is all that matters once you start practicing. A few years in the acute care setting and the degree is forgotten; solid experience is the key. My diploma is worth only as much as it cost to print it and frame it. My license and experience however, are invaluable. 

 

Take it for what it’s worth.

Occasional Visitor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-02-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I always say "you are what you make yourself". A pharmacist with either degree is only as good as his/her commitment to their specialty, whether in hospital or retail, clinical or management. Your peers will quickly sort it out, so be ready.

MK
Occasional Visitor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-02-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I think it depends on the individual.  Some Pharm. B's have practised for years on a very high professional level.  They have made it a point to read and study professional journals and books, attend professional meetings and are very current professionally.  Clinically, they are as good or better than a "good" Pharm D.  On the other hand, some Pharm.D's practise at a very low professional level, have no interest in improving their clinical knowledge.  Many of these do not bother to subscribe to professional journals, attend professional meetings, etc.  If they are asked to dose a new medication or discuss a new med w/ a patient, they usually reply "Nobody's taught me how to do that."   I have been a Pharm. B. for over 30 yrs and if a new med comes out, I start looking for professional literature and journal articals.  I consider myself a professional and feel it is my responsibility to continue my education in any way possible or necessary.   Yet, I have worked w/ many Pharm. D's who do not feel that way.  They expect the work place to take care of all their educational needs.  And, there are Pharm D's who are just the opposite.  I am currently working w/2 Pharm.D's who graduated at the same time from the same school and one seeks opportunities to grow professionally, the other is constantly saying "I've never been taught that".  Go figure.

Occasional Advisor
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-02-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I think this line got off topic from what the original poster meant. People taking this literally as registered vs not registered when I took it is BS Pharm VS PharmD.

 

I think once you get past a certain point, there is little difference. Granted, I don't have the PharmD initials, but I do the same clinical work and command the same respect, regardless of initials.

 

I try to see it more as MD vs DO, they both do the same work they just have different initials.

 

The fact is that, time and experience far outweigh the initials at the end of someone's names.

Advisor
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎02-25-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

 


PaulBSPharm wrote:

I always say "you are what you make yourself". A pharmacist with either degree is only as good as his/her commitment to their specialty, whether in hospital or retail, clinical or management. Your peers will quickly sort it out, so be ready.


 

Here here!  We are judged by ACTIONS, not WORDS.  A professional designation is just words.  Your personal committment to patient safety and quality pharmacy care will shine through regardless of title.

 

Charles Westergard BSPharm, MBA
A concern for patient safety stated, but not carried through into action, is as effective as no concern at all.
Occasional Advisor
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎02-26-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

Aaah...if only this were true where I work.  I have 35 years of experience doing what many consider 'clinical' pharmacy and yet because I do not have that Pharm D designation I am not qualified to do the clinical pharmacist job here.  I trained the current pharm D and she still comes to me with clinical questions.  Now they want a residency in addition - I guess since pharm D is now just an ENTRY LEVEL degree.  Go figure.  There was one pharmacist here with a PHD in chemistry and a Pharm D and SHE wasn't qualified enough.  Had to take a year off to do a residency.  What I'm saying is that in several places I've worked - that the BS designation has limited my opportunies despite having pursued advanced designations (CGP) and lots of extra education and experience.

jb
Occasional Visitor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-03-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I agree. You are dead on with your assessment.  Because of the number of limited RPh pharmacists, I think in the near future this will be a mute discussion.

Unfortunately, if you work in a RPh/Pharm  D mix environment, your ability to demonstrate your experience and  ability as a RPh depends upon  the Director of Pharmacy (DOP). I have know some Directors who allow both degrees to perform clinical duties, if competent and they have a willingness to learn. But, I have know Directors who only allow the PharmD degree to perform clinical duties. The persons ability to perform these duties should be the measuring tool and not a piece of paper from a University.

In my experience (34 years), I do not think the RPh/Pharm D divide is a good management philosophy. It leads to a "caste" system within the department and the untouchables (RPh) are separated as the "grunts" and the PharmD's become the priests. This leads to a lot of conflict and disruption within the department, and ultimately an increase in turn over and ineffectiveness within the department.

The replacement for the RPh in the future will be a PharmD without a residency. Let's get back to what made this country...Substance not looks or pretentiousness.

Advisor
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎02-25-2010
0

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I guess I've been lucky.  I probably should have said  "your actions SHOULD speak louder than words." 

 

I suppose in reality, just due to the time involved, DOPs (and other hiring managers) depend on things like letters behind a name and titles on a resume to weed through volumes of applicants.  I do the same in many ways with my email, only saving email from people I know and tossing all the rest.

 

 

Charles Westergard BSPharm, MBA
A concern for patient safety stated, but not carried through into action, is as effective as no concern at all.
Occasional Advisor
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎03-01-2010

Re: RPh vs. PharmD?

I truly wish that personal commitment, actions, experience, and track record were what counted and was what we are judged on but more and more I see job descriptions and job postings that only accept PharmDs. That is truly a shame. I also see the opposite end with what type of job a pharmacist with a PharmD is willing to accept.

Working at a small (100 beds), rural hospital requires the pharmacists to have to do both distributive and clinical duties (and inventory control and IV checks and IS work , etc. etc. etc.), and I have found that when interviewing pharmacist candidates the PharmDs have a list of their demands and ONLY want to do clinical duties (in general). One had the nerve to tell me that "entering orders in a computer" was as bad as working at McDonald's and she would never lower herself to do that. She did not understand how many clinical decisions a good pharmacist must make while "just entering orders". Currently, I have a great staff of all RPhs that I wouldn't trade for a PharmD with 2 year residency.

 

My own HR department thinks a PharmD should be paid more regardless if the duties are the same. They were willing to pay a new grad PharmD applicant $4.00 more an hour than RPhs who have been here 7 to 12 years, but wouldn't meet the request of a great RPh applicant with 20+ years experience for a salary at the level of our current staff.

 

Yes, I truly wish the letters behind the name did not create a divide between us. We need to join together - as PHARMACISTS - doing what ever it takes to do the best for our patients.